News and Updates from Tinnakill

Alexander Goldrun

Another Alexander Goldrun?

If yearling sales were easy, everyone would be doing it. Overall, we were happy with our results at Goffs and Tattersalls: our stock have found homes in the UK, Italy, Singapore, and in Ireland, and we wish the new owners the very best of luck with their purchases.

Read More »

Nenupher 090915PML714

Optimism rules

We promised that the next blog post would be in a positive vein, and as we look forward to the premier Irish yearling sale at Goffs next week, with the weather forecast to be balmy and the yearlings in great shape, optimism is the order of the day.

Read More »

2215645626_bfceaffb4f_z

Stud farm life is a rollercoaster

Is there ever a good time to write a breeding season blog post? Maybe in the short days of January, before mares start foaling and we get busy lining mares up for covering? Or maybe in mid-February, when a few early foals are on the ground, and we have news of maiden mares covered.

Read More »

IMG_0616

Looking back, looking forward

In the bloodstock world, everything revolves around the breeding season. After all, that’s the period of production: foals are born, mares go back in foal and so the cycle continues.

Read More »

Christmas at Tinnakill

Christmas Greetings

Warm Christmas greetings to all who’ve crossed our path this year, whether clients, suppliers or friends, from Dermot, Meta, Ian and all the team at Tinnakill House. Go n’eirigh an bothar libh.

Read More »

France

France

We occasionally base mares permanently in France or alternating between France and Ireland (French assimilated). This makes their progeny eligible for the attractive French owners’ and breeders’ premium schemes in France

Horses in France »

The USA

The USA

Tinnakill Bloodstock is a partner in Lemons Mill Farm in Lexington, Kentucky and we board some mares there.

Horses in the USA »

The UK

The UK

We own a number of mares in partnership with Eric Cantillon who is based at Herringswell Manor Stud near Newmarket.

Horses in the UK »